Six on Saturday #56 (May 23, 2020)

oxalis-articulata-2
Oxalis articulata

File under things that are counterintuitive:  the Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina area, which I perceive as being fairly sunny year-round,  receives more than twice the annual rainfall of notoriously damp London, England.  Part of the answer to this apparent conundrum is that London has more drizzly days (RDU has 109 days with some precipitation vs London’s 164).  Furthermore, we tend to have tropical-like afternoon thunderstorms during the summer, so many of those 109 rainy days are mostly sunny with thirty or forty minutes of heavy rain around the evening rush hour.

But sometimes we do have prolonged wet periods.  The freeze warning two weeks ago proved to be a false alarm, but this week has also been cooler than normal.  It was the cool of clouds and heavy rain, though, not the chill of dry Canadian air driven south.  Between Monday night and Friday morning, we received 6 inches (~15 cm) of rain.  The garden is looking particularly lush, but some plants are a bit floppy after growing like crazy for a week under heavy cloud cover.

Despite several of this week’s Six on Saturday originating in South America, all are garden plants that grow outside in the ground year round.  Most of these photos were taken last Saturday, before the heavy rain.  They’d look a lot more bedraggled if I photographed them today.

1. Cypella herbertii subsp. brevicristata

herbertii-brevicristata
Cypella herbertii subsp. brevicristata

Cypella herbertii is a small iris-relative from Argentina and Uruguay.  I have previously written about C. herbertii subsp. herbertii, and everything I wrote about culture applies to this subspecies, too.  Technically, the two subspecies are distinguished by the length of the stigma lobes, but the two forms that I grow also differ in their color:  my T. h. brevicristata has flowers of a clear yellow, while those of my T. h. herbertii are more orange.  This is the first year that my T. h. brevicristata has flowered, so it will be interesting to see if I get a mixture of colors among the volunteer seedlings in future years.

herbertii-herbertii
For comparison, here is Cypella herbertii subsp. herbertii

2. Hippeastrum x johnsonii (St. Joseph’s lily)

Hippeastrum-johnsonii

I featured this hybrid in my very first blog post.  At that time, I was growing it in my greenhouse, but I have since transplanted it to several places in the garden.  The best clump grows in full sun beside the bird bath, in soil that stays damp year round. H. x johnsonii,  a cross of H. reginae (southern Brazil) and H. vittatum (Peru), was the first artificial Hippeastrum hybrid. Its name commemorates Arthur Johnson, an English watchmaker and horticultural enthusiast who first made the cross at the end of the 18th century.  Surprisingly, given the origins of the parent species, H. x johnsonii is reputed to be among the most cold-hardy and vigorous of all Hippeastrum hybrids.

3. Clematis ‘Rooguchi’ (?)

rooguchi

The first flower on a Clematis that I planted last autumn.  I’m not entirely sure that it is correctly labeled.  The flower looks right, but Missouri Botanical Garden’s Plant Finder says that C. ‘Rooguchi’ is a non-vining hybrid lacking the twining petioles that help the vining varieties climb.  My plant definitely has twining petioles and is enthusiastically climbing some deer fencing stapled to the pergola.  Some websites agree with MoBot, while others say ‘Rooguchi’ is a climber like my plant.  Perhaps there are several different clones of the same cross all going under the same cultivar name?

4. Foundation plantings

Rosa_and_Phlomis

A two-for-one entry.  Along the south-facing foundation of our house, I planted a row of Rosa ‘Home Run’ and a clump of Phlomis fruticosa (Jerusalem sage) which is slowly spreading to surround the roses.  The Home Run rose is single-flowered (which I like) but lacks fragrance (which I do not).  Most importantly, though, it is very resistant to blights and mildews during hot, humid weather.

Home-run

P. fruticosa is marginally hardy here, so planting along the south foundation gives it sun in winter and protection from cold north and east winds.  Even so, it doesn’t flower very well and is sometimes damaged by snow and ice sliding off the roof. I do like the foliage, though, and the contrast with the glossy rose leaves.

Phlomis-fruticosa

5. Oxalis tetraphylla ‘Iron Cross’

Oxalis-tetraphylla-1

O. tetraphylla is from central Mexico and is one of the Oxalis species that grow from little corms.  I received it as a freebie in a bulb order five or six years ago and decide to chance growing it in the ground.  So far, it has been well-behaved in the garden, tolerating freezing temperatures and showing no tendency to spread and become a weed like some Oxalis.

Oxalis-tetraphylla-2

6. Oxalis articulata (syn. O. crassipes)

oxalis-articulata

I found this plant growing on our property when we first moved into our newly built house.  O. articulata is a South American species with a long history in cultivation, so I suspect that like the Gladiolus ‘Eno Orange’ it may have been planted by previous owners of the land and survived the intervening years when the property was left fallow.  I have since dug it up and distributed the knobbly little rhizomes to several places in my garden.  O. articulata can apparently become mildly invasive in some climates, but my plant seems to be sterile, at least in the absence of another clone, and shows no inclination to spread on its own.

The Propagator is the host of Six on Saturday.  Head over there to see his Six and find links to the blogs of other participants.

Six on Saturday #52 (March 21, 2020)

For this week’s Six on Saturday, we are out of the garden and visiting the Eno River Confluence Natural Area.  The Eno River is one of the gems of this part of North Carolina.  A small river, little more than a large stream for much of its 40-mile course through Orange and Durham counties, it flows through the town of Hillsborough and city of Durham before merging with the Flat and Little Rivers to form the Neuse River.  The Eno is home to several rare species that are endemic to the Neuse River basin, and it has been aggressively protected since the late 1960s by the Eno River Association.  The Confluence Natural Area is a piece of protected land in Orange County that includes the spot where the East and West forks of the Eno flow together to form the Eno River proper.  It was opened to the public relatively recently, and this was our first visit.

When my family and I visited, we were the only people on the 200-acre preserve, so I guess that covered social distancing requirements.

1.  The Confluence

Confluence

This is the point at which east fork (left) and west fork (right) merge to form the Eno (center).

2.  Plethodon cylindraceus (white-spotted slimy salamander)

Plethodon

The kids couldn’t resist lifting a cover board that had probably been laid down for some herpetology classes.  They found a handsome pair of slimy salamanders.  To avoid crushing the salamanders, we gently moved them, laid the board back down, and then allowed the salamanders to climb underneath again.

3. Claytonia virginica (Virginia springbeauty)

Claytonia

A variety of spring ephemeral wildflowers were in bloom on the wooded slopes and rich bottomland along the riverbanks.  In North Carolina, C. virginica is a true piedmont native.  It is absent from most of the coastal plain and from the mountains, where it is replaced by Claytonia caroliniana.

4. Cardamine concatenata (cutleaf toothwort; crow’s toes)

Cardamine

I just love the name “crow’s toes.”

5. Stellaria pubera (star chickweed)

Stellaria

In addition to these three wildflowers, we also saw Hepatica americana (round-lobed Hepatica), Anemonella thalictroides (rue anemone), Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot), and Lindera benzoin (spicebush)  in bloom.  Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) leaves were up, but the buds aren’t yet open.

6. Tree “footprint”

tree footprint

The heavy piedmont clay holds together so well, that the imprint of a large tree, including tunnels left by its roots, is still clearly visible after all the wood has rotted away.  The “footprint” is slowly being covered by invasive Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica).

The propagator is the host of Six on Saturday.  Head over there to see his Six and find links to the blogs of other participants.

Frost flowers

frost flower
Frozen sap extruded from a stem of Salvia elegans

Frost flowers typically occur in in late autumn when cold weather freezes plant stems but the soil is still warm enough for active roots to push sap into the stem.  As the sap freezes, ice is extruded through cracks in the stem, forming thin ribbons or spines.  In North Carolina, frost flowers are most often associated with Verbesina species, particularly Verbesina virginica (frostweed), but yesterday I found these examples on Salvia elegans (pineapple sage).  They are, perhaps, not as delicate as the frost flowers that form on Verbesina, and from a distance looked more like frost seed pods than flowers, but they seem to have been formed by the same mechanism as the classic frost flowers.

As indicated by the presence of frost flowers, the first freezes of the season occurred on Tuesday and Wednesday nights.  A few weeks ago, we were flirting with 90 F (32 C), but this morning the temperature was about 24 F (-4.5 C).  The growing season for summer perennials and sub-tropical plants is definitely over.  The cannas, bananas, and crinums have all turned black, and in a few weeks I’ll cut them back.  The only plants still flowering outside are Crocus cartwrightianus ‘Albus’, Camellia ‘Yuletide’Cyclamen hederifolium, and Abutilon megapotamicum (which continues to amaze me with its hardiness), but buds are expanding on Edgeworthia chrysantha.

Six on Saturday #48 (September 28, 2019)

We’re almost a week past the autumnal equinox, but it still feels like summer.  Temperatures are running about ten degrees F above normal, and we haven’t had measurable rain since August.  The soil is bone dry, and leaves are starting to dry up instead of changing color properly.  There’s a chance of a shower tonight, but the forecast for the next week is more of the same: bright sun and mid 80s-90s F until Friday at least.

1. Epiphyllum oxypetalum (queen of the night)

Epiphyllum1
Bud opening at 2100.
Epiphyllum2
Fully open at 2215
Epiphyllum3
Collapsing at 0700 the next morning

The large, fragrant flowers of E. oxypetalum, an epiphytic cactus from southern Mexico and Guatemala, open at night and fade by the next morning.  I was pleased with this solitary bloom, but when I posted a picture on Facebook, a friend told me that his plant had more than 40 flowers!

2. Spiranthes odorata?  (ladies’ tresses)

Spiranthes

I think this is S. odorata, but I’m really not sure how to distinguish that species from S. cernua.  Paul Martin Brown [1] says that there is considerable gene-flow between S. cernua and other Spiranthes species, so maybe a definite I.D. is impossible. Either way, I like the flowers.  These little orchids don’t seem to be very long-lived, but they seed around and sprout in the pots of various bog plants.  This one volunteered in a pot of Gentiana autumnalis.

3.  Diospyros virginiana (American persimmon)

persimmon1

persimmon2

About nine years ago, I transplanted some root suckers from a large persimmon planted by my wife’s grandparents in Pennsylvania, probably in the 1940s.  The transplants have finally given us some fruit, which is seedy but delicious.  These are the first of the harvest, and we’ll be picking more as they become soft enough to eat.  You do NOT want to sample an American persimmon that isn’t fully ripe.  They are unbelievably astringent.

4.  Hedychium coccineum ‘Applecourt’

Hedychium applecourt

I thought I had already featured this hardy ornamental ginger, but I can’t find it in any past blog posts.  The flowers lack the fragrance of H. coronarium, but I am a sucker for bright orange.  In previous years, it has given me one flush of flowers at the tail end of summer, but this year the clump has finally grown large enough to flower on and off for months.

5. Colchicum ‘Innocence’

Colchicum innocence

This is a white flowered clone of the sterile hybrid Colchicum byzantinus.  My colchicums have struggled this year, probably due to the high temperatures and lack of rain in autumn thus far, and many have not yet poked their noses above the soil.

6. Salvia elegans (pineapple sage)

Salvia_elegans

S. elegans is usually grown as an annual north of zone 8, but my plants survived last winter.  Another sign that climate zones are shifting north, I suppose.  This species gives me attractive foliage on a neat shrub-like form for most of the spring and summer, and then it flowers just in time for the autumn migration of the ruby-throated hummingbird.

The propagator is the host of Six on Saturday.  Head over there to see his Six and find links to the blogs of other participants.

Reference

1. Brown, P.M. (2004).  Wild Orchids of the Southeastern United States North of Peninsular Florida.  University Press of Florida, Gainsville, Florida.

Six on Saturday #47 (August 24, 2019)

The first two plants in this Six on Saturday post bloomed in early August, after S.O.S #46, but I thought they were worth including even though they aren’t flowering today.  The remaining four plants are currently in bloom.

1. Rhododendron prunifolium (plum-leaf azalea)

Rhodo_prunifolium

Rhododendron prunifolium is one of the latest-blooming of the North American deciduous azaleas. With its flowers tucked in among leaves, I think it looks more subdued and elegant than the flamboyant species that bloom on bare branches early in the spring.  Very rare in the wild, it is native only to a small region of Alabama and Georgia along the Chattahoochee River.

2. Lycoris x rosea ‘Neon Nights’

Lycoris_rosea

This cross of Lycoris radiata and L. sprengeri blooms at about the same time as my L. radiata var. pumila plants.  The photo doesn’t exaggerate the intensity of its color.

3. Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed)

Asclepias incarnata-2

Despite its common name, Asclepias incarnata grows reasonably well in regular garden soil.  It doesn’t seem to be as long-lived as Asclepias tuberosa, though.  This is probably a third-generation seedling, and the first generation of plants that I grew are all long dead.

4. Gentiana andrewsii (closed bottle gentian)

Gentiana_andrewsii

Gentiana andrewsii is one of the more bizarre flowers in my garden.  It is native to the northeastern and midwestern states and Canada but seems to do reasonably well in the NC piedmont.  The flower never opens and is pollinated by bees that are strong enough to force their way inside.  If I don’t do some weeding soon, these plants will be choked out by invasive Duchesnea indica (mock strawberry) that are invading the flower bed from a nearby lawn*

*lawn, meaning green weeds that can survive being mowed.

5. Barnadia japonica (Japanese squill)

Scilla_scilloides

I really don’t remember planting this little bulb among the cactus and agaves that surround our wellhead.  I do have a small clump of bulbs elsewhere in the garden, so I wonder if a squirrel transplanted this one.

6. Calanthe reflexa

Calanthe_reflexa

Well, this was a disappointment.  Calanthe reflexa has miniscule flowers, and the color of this clone is an insipid pale violet. About the only thing that makes it worthy of growing is its blooming season–months after all the other hardy Calanthe species and hybrids have finished flowering.

The Propagator is the host of Six on Saturday.  Head over there to see his Six and find links to the blogs of other participants.