Sea myrtle

sea_myrtle1
Baccharis halimifolia in Durham County today.

Sea myrtle (Baccharis halimifolia) is one of the most striking native shrubs in the NC piedmont at this time of year.  Its fuzzy white seed heads are a common sight beside lakes, in unmown fields, and along roads, where its tolerance for salt is a definite advantage.  B. halimifolia is a member of the Asteraceae, the daisy family, although the family resemblance is difficult to see at first glance.  It’s a woody shrub, instead of a forb, and its inflorescences lack the colorful ray flowers that give the showier members of the family their horticultural value.  However, the white plumes attached to the seeds make the plant look as though it is covered with snow and more than make up for the lack of color.

sea_myrtle2

I’m surprised that sea myrtle isn’t used more often as a garden shrub for seasonal interest.   Though I have previously criticized the groundskeepers on the campus where I work, I have to admit they have done a good job incorporating some volunteer B. halimifolia into the landscape.  By removing the lower branches, they have exposed the twisted trunks and turned the plants into very interesting specimens.

sea_myrtle3

The only defects of B. halimifolia from a horticultural point of view seem to be its brittle wood and its production of huge quantities of airborne seeds.  Many horticulturally valuable shrubs are also brittle (e.g. my Hypericum frondosum, which snapped under snow this winter), so that doesn’t seem to be a fatal flaw.  More problematic is its tendency to become weedy.  It is apparently invasive in southern Europe and Australia.  Perhaps it would be best to grow it only in its native range.

One thought on “Sea myrtle

  1. Our native baccharis are popular only because they happen to be natives that do not need much water. Gardeners water them until they rot anyway, so it does not much matter. The ground cover form is the only one that is really popular. The shrubby species is typically only grown where it self sows. Someone else just wrote about their native baccharis. https://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com/2018/11/20/fluffy-poverty-weed-and-fleecy-clouds/

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s